How To Get The Most From Your Podcast Guests

How To Get The Most From Your Podcast Guests

You’ve come up with a podcast concept, and you’re ready to start production. That’s great! You’ve got the gear. You’ve watched a few editing tutorials on YouTube. Now you’re ready to start recording episodes–but how do you get guests for your show?

If you’re planning on creating an interview series, there are a few things you need to know before diving headfirst into production. Having guests on your show isn’t just about having someone to talk to on your podcast. It can act as a networking and promotional tool for your show–not to mention the quality content you will be creating.

Remember: when you have someone as a guest on your podcast, you’re creating high-value networking opportunities that will jump-start a valuable relationship. So, you need to choose guests that align with your niche and career goals. Don’t settle for guests that will take up airtime. Your podcast deserves the best.

I decided to talk to a few individuals in the coaching industry about their experience as a podcast guest. I wanted to see how shows found them, how their episodes were promoted, and the overall experience they had been a guest on a podcast. Hopefully, these stories will help you determine the best approach to acquiring guests for your show and how you can make them feel like rockstars.

Finding Your Guests

Lynn Casper
Productivity Coach & Founder of FocusTime, a virtual LGBTQ coworking & creative space. Creator of the Homoground Podcast.

The question I often hear from new podcasters is: How do I find guests for my podcast?

Do you ask your best friend? Do you walk outside and find the first stranger that crosses your path? You could try those things, but I wouldn’t recommend the latter. Podcast production takes a lot of time and effort, and you want to make sure the guests on your show will enhance your listener’s experience–but how do you find such guests?

Here are some of the ways podcasts reached out to the coaches I interviewed:

“A friend of mine reached out to the podcast. They heard I was doing a lot of work in the community.”

Kenny Jeannot
Basketball Skills Specialist

“Word of mouth, which is how my business has grown. Some of my podcast guest opportunities have been through speaking engagements and the professional relationships I have.”

Vivian Garcia-Tunon
Career & Executive Coach | Strategic Human Resources Consultant | Keynote Speaker

“Some opportunities I found myself, but mostly, people find me through LinkedIn or hear me on other podcasts.”

Regina Huber

“Most of my podcast guest opportunities were through mutual friends, or if we met at a networking event.”

Fredelyne Alcide
Multi-Media Professional: Host | Podcasters| Podcast, Event and Digital Producer| Speaker | Consultant

As you can see, there’s more than one way to recruit a guest for your podcast. Facebook Groups are a great resource for hive-mind answers, networking, and podcast guests! Watch what happens when you post that you’re looking for experts to interview on your podcast. You’ll get comments galore!

Tap those successful friends, or inspirational colleagues to talk about themselves on their show. They’ll love chewing the fat about their accomplishments, and it’ll bring you closer together.

If you go to a convention and see a public speaker that really moves you–reach out to them and ask them to be on your podcast! There are also lots of experts, coaches, and motivational speakers on Instagram that would love to promote their services on your podcast.

Making Sure Your Guest Has Fun

The most important part about having guests on your podcast, is making sure they’re enjoying the experience. That way, they’ll be more inclined to promote the episode and come back to chat again. Podcasting isn’t the main stream media practice of sound bites and confrontation. Podcasting is all about listening, great conversations, and real human connection.

“Yeah, it’s always fun talking about yourself. I was a little nervous, and they made me feel comfortable. They had subjects ready to talk about and they were prepared.”

Kenny Jeannot
Basketball Skills Specialist

“It’s a conversation– so it’s great to be prepared, but maybe in the middle of our conversation something comes up–and if you’re a good podcast host and you’re listening something might come out of it. Listen with the intent of being in a conversation.”

Kate Eckman
Certified Executive Coach. Author and TV Personality

“Yeah, absolutely I had fun. I have not had a negative experience. It might be challenging sometimes– there was one incident where at the beginning of the episode I was not the only guest. That was a bit challenging.”

Regina Huber

“Absolutely! It feels like you’re just having a conversation with a friend and sharing something you’re passionate about.”

Vivian Garcia-Tunon
Career & Executive Coach | Strategic Human Resources Consultant | Keynote Speaker

“Yes! I have to say I think it’s as fun being a guest as it is being a podcast host. It’s fun to connect with people and share my story in different ways.”

Allison Jackson
* Wellness Advocate * Accountability Coach * Macro Pro * Author * Speaker * Podcaster *
Ross Tartell
Executive Coach-No one gets to the Olympics on their own | Talent & Leadership Development | Bottom Line Impact

Listeners don’t want to hear you argue with your guests. They want to feel like they’re hanging out with their best friends, listening to a great conversation.

Your guest is going to love sitting behind a microphone and sharing their story. Guests won’t be impressed if you don’t do your research before talking to them, so make sure you’re prepared for your interviews! Give them the spotlight so they can feel like a star. Ensure you know what you want to talk about, but be open to seeing where the conversation takes you. That’s the beauty of podcasting.

Promoting Your Podcast Episode

Promoting a podcast episode that features an interview with a special guest not only helps get the word out about your show–but your guest benefits from the publicity as well! What’s the point of putting all of that work into a stellar podcast episode, only to post it once and be done with it?

You need to let the internet know that you’ve got great content. Let’s see how our coaches felt about the promotion of their podcast episodes:

“The podcast’s team sent me an email. I appreciate it when a podcast sends me materials that I can use on my social media. Make it easy for your guests to promote you!”

Kate Eckman
Certified Executive Coach. Author and TV Personality

I’m usually told–but there were a few times where I wasn’t told about the episode. So, I had to go back and ask! I really wanted to share it in my mailing list.”

Regina Huber

“My episode went live as I was interviewed, and they also gave me a package with pictures, videos, and a link to the episode–so they made it really easy to share everything.”

Kenny Jeannot
Basketball Skills Specialist

“One time, they sent the episode to me to preview it to make sure I was confortable with it. Other times, it went live and they sent me a link in an email.”

Vivian Garcia-Tunon
Career & Executive Coach | Strategic Human Resources Consultant | Keynote Speaker
Allison Jackson
* WELLNESS ADVOCATE * ACCOUNTABILITY COACH * MACRO PRO * AUTHOR * SPEAKER * PODCASTER *

The reason you invite guests onto your podcast is the hope that your guest will tell their audience about your show. The more guests you have on your show, the more new listeners will be introduced to it. You have to make it easy for people to share your podcast episodes.

Many of these podcast guests liked receiving emails with download links and social media graphics, so you should implement this practice into your podcast production routine. Feel free to provide a copy in the email, so they don’t even have to think of what to say. The easier you make it for your guests to share your episodes, the more likely they will.

Also, encourage your podcast guests to share their podcast episode with their newsletter subscribers or private Discord server members. They’ll love sharing valuable content with their audience and the fact they didn’t have to create it themselves.

There are a lot of ways to benefit from having guests on your podcast. If you haven’t launched your show yet, record a few episodes anyway to get a feel for your show and learn your production pace. You should have five interviews “in the can” before you even start thinking about putting your episodes together. You always want a cushion of content to help you keep up with your podcast production pace.

Got a question about podcast production? I’m here to help! Get your first hour of consultation services for only $35! I’ll give you a wealth of information in 60 minutes.

Book your first session, today!: https://calendly.com/joannavt/introductory-consultation-session

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